Python os.path.normpath() Method

Python os.path.normpath() method is used to normalize a pathname by collapsing redundant separators and up-level references so that A//B, A/B/, A/./B, and A/foo/../B all become A/B.

It does not change the actual filesystem representation of the path, but it cleans up the path string based on typical filesystem path semantics.

This method converts forward slashes to backslashes on Windows and cleans up redundant separators (//, \\\\, etc.).

It handles up-level references like .. and . in paths, simplifying them where possible.

Syntax

os.path.normpath(path)

Parameters

Name Description
path (string) It is the path you want to normalize.

Return value

It returns a new string representing the normalized pathname.

Example 1: Simplifying a Path

Visual Representation of Python os.path.normpath() Method

import os

path = 'folder/env/../file.txt'

normalized_path = os.path.normpath(path)

print(normalized_path)

Output

folder/file.txt

Example 2: Cleaning up redundant separators

Cleaning up redundant separators

import os

path = 'folder//env////file.txt'

normalized_path = os.path.normpath(path)

print(normalized_path)

Output

folder/env/file.txt

Example 3: Handling Up-Level References

Handling Up-Level References

import os

path = 'folder/././env/../file.txt'

normalized_path = os.path.normpath(path)

print(normalized_path)

Output

folder/file.txt

The os.path.normpath() method is helpful in file operations where you need a cleaned-up and standardized path representation, ensuring more predictable behavior of the path string, especially when working across different operating systems or dealing with paths constructed dynamically.

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