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Java Math nextUp() Function Example

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Java Math nextUp() is an inbuilt method that is used to find the immediate next(closest to positive infinity) floating-point value that exists after the value passed as a parameter. The nextUp() method comes handy because floating-point numbers are not equidistant and are finite in number. It is to be noted that a nextUp implementation of the equivalent nextAfter implementation may run faster.

Java Math nextUp()

Java nextUp() method returns the floating-point value adjacent to the given number in the direction of positive infinity.

Syntax

public static float nextUp(float a)
public static double nextUp(double a)

Parameter(s)

A floating-point value (float or double).

Return Value

The immediate next(closest to positive infinity) floating-point value that exists after the passed value.

See the following figure.

 

Java Math nextUp()

Note

  1. This method is a semantic equivalent of nextAfter(d, Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY) [or nextAfter(f, Float.POSITIVE_INFINITY)].
  2. If an argument is NaN, then this method returns NaN.
  3. If an argument is zero, then this method returns Double.MIN_VALUE(for double type) or Float.MIN_VALUE(for float type).
  4. If an argument is a positive infinity, this method returns positive infinity.

Consider the following examples.

Example1.java: The following example demonstrates the use of this method.

public class Example1{
	public static void main(String [] args){
		float a = 13.4f;
		double b = 13.4;


		System.out.println(Math.nextUp(a));
		System.out.println(Math.nextUp(b));
	}
}

Output

Output:
->javac Example1.java
->java Example1
13.400001
13.400000000000002

Example2.java: The following example demonstrates the use of this method on negative floating-point values.

See the following code.

public class Example2{
	public static void main(String [] args){
		float a = -13.4f;
		double b = -13.4;


		System.out.println(Math.nextUp(a));
		System.out.println(Math.nextUp(b));
	}
}

Output

->javac Example2.java
->java Example2
-13.399999
-13.399999999999999

Example3.java: The following example demonstrates the relation between nextUp and nextAfter methods.

See the following code.

public class Example3 {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    float a = 104.451f;
    double b = 736.147;

    System.out.println(Math.nextUp(a));
    System.out.println(Math.nextAfter(a, Float.POSITIVE_INFINITY));

    System.out.println(Math.nextUp(b));
    System.out.println(Math.nextAfter(b, Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY));
  }
}

Output

->javac Example3.java
->java Example3
104.451004
104.451004
736.1470000000002
736.1470000000002

Example4.java: The following example demonstrates the situation of passing NaN.

See the following code.

public class Example4 {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    float a = Float.NaN;
    double b = Double.NaN;

    System.out.println(Math.nextUp(a));
    System.out.println(Math.nextUp(b));
  }
}

Output

->javac Example4.java
->java Example4
NaN
NaN

Example5.java: The following example demonstrates the situation of passing zero.

See the following code.

public class Example5 {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    float a = 0.0f;
    double b = 0.0;

    System.out.println(Math.nextUp(a));
    System.out.println(Float.MIN_VALUE);
    System.out.println(Math.nextUp(b));
    System.out.println(Double.MIN_VALUE);
  }
}

Output

->javac Example5.java
->java Example5
1.4E-45
1.4E-45
4.9E-324
4.9E-324

Example6.java: The following example demonstrates the situation of passing positive infinity.

See the following code.

public class Example6 {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    float a = Float.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
    double b = Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY;

    System.out.println(Math.nextUp(a));
    System.out.println(Math.nextUp(b));
  }
}

Output

->javac Example6.java
->java Example6
Infinity
Infinity

See also

Java Math nextDown()

Java Math nextAfter()

Java Math max()

Java Math floor()

Java Math cbrt()

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